This website is the digital version of the 2014 National Climate Assessment, produced in collaboration with the U.S. Global Change Research Program.

For the official version, please refer to the PDF in the downloads section. The downloadable PDF is the official version of the 2014 National Climate Assessment.

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Welcome to the National Climate Assessment

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.

Explore the effects of climate change
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Figure 17.12: A Southeast River Basin Under Stress

A Southeast River Basin Under Stress

Figure 17.12: The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin in Georgia exemplifies a place where many water uses are in conflict, and future climate change is expected to exacerbate this conflict.1 The basin drains 19,600 square miles in three states and supplies water for multiple, often competing, uses, including irrigation, drinking water and other municipal uses, power plant cooling, navigation, hydropower, recreation, and ecosystems. Under future climate change, this basin is likely to experience more severe water supply shortages, more frequent emptying of reservoirs, violation of environmental flow requirements (with possible impacts to fisheries at the mouth of the Apalachicola), less energy generation, and more competition for remaining water. Adaptation options include changes in reservoir storage and release procedures and possible phased expansion of reservoir capacity.1,2,3 Additional adaptation options could include water conservation and demand management. (Figure source: Georgakakos et al. 20101).

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References

  1. Georgakakos, A., and F. Zhang, 2011: Climate Change Scenario Assessment for ACF, OOA, SO, ACT, TN, and OSSS Basins in Georgia. Georgia Water Resources Institute (GWRI) Technical Report. 229 pp., Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. | Detail

  2. Georgakakos, A. P., F. Zhang, and H. Yao, 2010: Climate Variability and Change Assessment for the ACF River Basin, Southeast US. Georgia Water Resources Institute (GWRI) Technical Report sponsored by NOAA, USGS, and Georgia EPD. 321 pp., Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA. | Detail

  3. Georgakakos, K. P., N. E. Graham, F. - Y. Cheng, C. Spencer, E. Shamir, A. P. Georgakakos, H. Yao, and M. Kistenmacher, 2012: Value of adaptive water resources management in northern California under climatic variability and change: Dynamic hydroclimatology. Journal of Hydrology, 412-413, 47-65, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.04.032. | Detail

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.

United States Global Change Research Program logo United States Global Change Research Program participating agency logos