This website is the digital version of the 2014 National Climate Assessment, produced in collaboration with the U.S. Global Change Research Program.

For the official version, please refer to the PDF in the downloads section. The downloadable PDF is the official version of the 2014 National Climate Assessment.

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Welcome to the National Climate Assessment

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Figure 33.42: Ice Loss from Greenland and Antarctica

Ice Loss from Greenland and Antarctica

Figure 33.42: Rate of local ice sheet mass loss (in inches of water-equivalent-height per year) from Greenland (left) and Antarctica (right) from 2003 to 2012. The GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites measure changes in the pull of gravity over these two regions. As they lose ice to the oceans, the gravitational pull of Greenland and Antarctica is reduced. Analyses of GRACE data have now proven that both of the major ice sheets are currently contributing to global sea level rise due to ice loss. Over the periods plotted here, Greenland lost enough ice to raise sea level at a rate of 0.028 inches per year (0.72 mm/yr), and Antarctica lost ice at a rate that caused 0.0091 inches of sea level rise per year (0.24 mm/yr). (Figure source: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, (left) updated from Velicogna and Wahr 2013;1 (right) updated from Ivins et al. 20132).

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References

  1. Ivins, E. R., T. S. James, J. Wahr, E. J. O. Schrama, F. W. Landerer, and K. M. Simon, 2013: Antarctic contribution to sea level rise observed by GRACE with improved GIA correction. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 118, 3126-3141, doi:10.1002/jgrb.50208. URL | Detail

  2. Velicogna, I., and J. Wahr, 2013: Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data. Geophysical Research Letters, 40, 3055-3063, doi:10.1002/grl.50527. URL | Detail

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future.

A team of more than 300 experts guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee produced the report, which was extensively reviewed by the public and experts, including federal agencies and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences.

United States Global Change Research Program logo United States Global Change Research Program participating agency logos